The VaxCalc Ingredient Report

VaxCalc provides what is so often missing for us when trying to make informed vaccination decisions: evidence-based, data-driven, visual representation of the potential risks.

Getting Oriented with VaxCalc

VaxCalc has a very simple flow. No matter where you are in VaxCalc, you can return to the start by clicking on the upper left corner of the screen where you see the chemistry flasks:

Getting Started

Step 1: tell VaxCalc about who is being vaccinated.  VaxCalc uses the information – name, age, weight – to customize your ingredient report.

Then just click the green Submit button.  VaxCalc does hundreds of initial calculations, sets up a custom rules engine (just for you!) and then presents you with a list of vaccines.

From the vaccine list, you can select one or more vaccines.  For example, go ahead and select DTaP. 

The first thing VaxCalc does, as soon as you select DTaP, is analyze exactly what you have chosen: “3 doses of 3 vaccines in 1 shot, containing 9 ingredients.”  (This text is shown right above the big red button on the right side of the image below.)

We don’t have time in this email to get into this, but if you selected Hepatitis B in addition to DTaP, VaxCalc would show you “4 doses of 4 vaccines in 2 shots, containing multiple doses of 11 ingredients.”

Exploring the Ingredient Report

Scroll down the page to the Ingredient Report and find Aluminum. 

Note: the Ingredient Report is filled with important research and details – almost 2,000 words  just for DTaP.  If you are using the free version of VaxCalc, you’ll see ingredients but not the customized report content.

We will take a look at just one small part – a very important part – of the aluminum report: the “possibly-safe” chart.  VaxCalc takes the person’s weight, runs a calculation through FDA regulatory guidance for medications with aluminum, and comes up with a “possibly safe” amount of aluminum.

The “possibly-safe” chart comes with a detailed explanation, and a linked reference to actual FDA regulations should you wish to discuss with your doctor.  

VaxCalc provides what is so often missing for us when trying to make informed vaccination decisions: evidence-based, data-driven, visual representation of the potential risks.

What’s next?

In our next lesson, we’ll continue this example and demonstrate how VaxCalc helps you reduce exposures to potentially toxic ingredients such as aluminum.